4 tips when painting!

PRT

1. Selecting what paint to use:

As with almost everything, cheapest is usually never be the best, but depending on your application. It is also important to note how long that paint will protect the surface for, how well it does in rough conditions, etc. These days there are premium paint that lasts longer, and survives better in rough conditions - this will cost a bit more now… but save you thousands in the long-run.

Plus some premium paints dry faster, or can require less coats, and are easier to apply! Not to mention colour quality does vary a lot.

2. DIY or hire someone:

Sure, doing it yourself will save a lot of money, but it actually is not as easy as it looks. It can be very obvious if a house has been painted by an amateur. However if you are looking to save a bit of money… do a bit of research. Here is an article that covers off some important points:

http://www.familyhandyman.com/painting/techniques/10-interior-house-painting-tips-painting-techniques-for-the-perfect-paint-job/view-all

If you want to enlist a professional, get in touch we can guide you through quotes and price.

3. Colour Scheme

Colour scheme is very important, particularly when you come to sell. Bold, Vibrant colours can polarise your potential buyer market. Whilst simple tones can add a lot of class / style to your property. Most paint stores offer in-house consultants, either FREE or for a very nominal price. Definitely worth looking into it. We can also give  you some direction as to what colours suit best for selling.

4. How about not paint?

A lot of older homes still have that beautiful timber interior. If your door frames are looking at bit tired… peel back some paint and see what is underneath. Timber door frames / skirtings are well very popular and require very little maintenance. 

Consult your local paint store to find the right methods of stripping back the paint. When going to polish / protect the wood afterwards, keep it as simple as possible and just bring out the the wood’s natural colour.

Side note: if your door frames are native timber… chances are your floor boards are too.